Environment

Early findings of global survey show existing data may be inaccurate.  MIAMI (June 22, 2016) – Researchers attempting the world’s largest-ever survey of shark populations have reached their first 100 reefs, collecting exciting footage along the way. Deploying baited remote underwater video (BRUV) equipment, researchers are catching the ocean’s top predators, including sharks and rays, on camera in their natural habitats. Nearly a quarter of these predators are threatened with extinction, yet the lack of comprehensive and up-to-date data on species abundance and distribution is hindering efforts to protect these important marine animals. The survey project, dubbed Global FinPrint, is focusing on coral reef habitats worldwide.
Oil covered sand is shown on June 23, 2010 in Pensacola Beach, FL.  MIAMI (May 31, 2016) — When an explosion at the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig sent millions of gallons of oil spilling into the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, it ignited one of the largest environmental disasters in modern history. Six years later, scientists are still working to fully determine, understand and mitigate the damage that was done.
MIAMI (May 13, 2016) —The first captive-bred Florida Grasshopper Sparrow hatched this week under the care of researchers with FIU’s Tropical Conservation Institute. One of the world’s most endangered birds, the Florida Grasshopper Sparrow exclusively resides in Central Florida. At last count, less than 100 males remain in the wild and the number of elusive females is unknown. Last year, seven sparrows were put in the care of TCI researchers — the first to ever be reared in a captive setting.
NEW YORK – Several Caribbean community (CARICOM) countries have signed the Paris Agreement on climate change, the landmark accord that sets outs a global action plan to put the world on track to avoid dangerous global warming. Antigua and Barbuda, The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia and Trinidad and Tobago were among the 171 countries that signed the accord late last month.
Thanks to ongoing research, we know how much America’s coast contributes to the national economy. But what does that mean on a local level The national economic impact of beaches is clear – in tourism and taxes, in revenues and returns on investment. Consider these facts:
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