Books

How do you capture the spirit and energy of a lightning-fast movement and get that information to people in a hurry? That's the task I faced in writing about Bernie Sanders and his populist presidential campaign. I was perfectly suited to writing The Essential Bernie Sanders and His Vision for America (Chelsea Green, $14) because half of my professional life has been in social and political organizing.
For writers, whose careers are mostly defined by thankless struggle, it's often the little things that sustain us, those all-too-infrequent moments that come at the fruition of a long-gestating project, that remind us why we subject ourselves to so much anxiety, frustration and self-doubt.
This week marks the 70th anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The atomic and plutonium bombs killed 129,000-246,000 people, mostly civilians. A year later, John Hersey's classic Hiroshima was published in the New Yorker; subsequently brought out in book form by Knopf, it has never been out of print and has sold more than three million copies. 
As the 2016 presidential campaign gains momentum, one thing you can count on during the ceremonial browbeating and breast-beating competition will be a concurrent surge in "rant lit" books. They're the ones that aren't simply published, but seem to be hurled ferociously across the political divide in a high stakes game of biblio-dodgeball.
This week marks the 70th anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The atomic and plutonium bombs killed 129,000-246,000 people, mostly civilians. A year later, John Hersey's classic Hiroshima was published in the New Yorker; subsequently brought out in book form by Knopf, it has never been out of print and has sold more than three million copies.
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