Books

This week marks the 70th anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The atomic and plutonium bombs killed 129,000-246,000 people, mostly civilians. A year later, John Hersey's classic Hiroshima was published in the New Yorker; subsequently brought out in book form by Knopf, it has never been out of print and has sold more than three million copies. 
As the 2016 presidential campaign gains momentum, one thing you can count on during the ceremonial browbeating and breast-beating competition will be a concurrent surge in "rant lit" books. They're the ones that aren't simply published, but seem to be hurled ferociously across the political divide in a high stakes game of biblio-dodgeball.
This week marks the 70th anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The atomic and plutonium bombs killed 129,000-246,000 people, mostly civilians. A year later, John Hersey's classic Hiroshima was published in the New Yorker; subsequently brought out in book form by Knopf, it has never been out of print and has sold more than three million copies.
Recently, Chronicle Books published Lists of Note: An Eclectic Collection Deserving of a Wider Audience, compiled by Shaun Usher. Usher's 125 lists, with facsimiles or illustrations, will intrigue and amuse, and sometimes surprise: Einstein, as his first marriage deteriorated, imposed conditions on his wife if they were to stay together, including "I will receive three meals regularly in my room....
As a kid, I never went to summer camp. The farthest I ever got from home was family camping trips to the Oregon coast, and if it wasn't the mosquitoes, it was the rain that bummed us out. But had I known then just how terrible a summer vacation could be, I probably wouldn't have whined so much.
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