How do you capture the spirit and energy of a lightning-fast movement and get that information to people in a hurry? That's the task I faced in writing about Bernie Sanders and his populist presidential campaign. I was perfectly suited to writing The Essential Bernie Sanders and His Vision for America (Chelsea Green, $14) because half of my professional life has been in social and political organizing.
For writers, whose careers are mostly defined by thankless struggle, it's often the little things that sustain us, those all-too-infrequent moments that come at the fruition of a long-gestating project, that remind us why we subject ourselves to so much anxiety, frustration and self-doubt.
This week marks the 70th anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The atomic and plutonium bombs killed 129,000-246,000 people, mostly civilians. A year later, John Hersey's classic Hiroshima was published in the New Yorker; subsequently brought out in book form by Knopf, it has never been out of print and has sold more than three million copies. 
As the 2016 presidential campaign gains momentum, one thing you can count on during the ceremonial browbeating and breast-beating competition will be a concurrent surge in "rant lit" books. They're the ones that aren't simply published, but seem to be hurled ferociously across the political divide in a high stakes game of biblio-dodgeball.
This week marks the 70th anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The atomic and plutonium bombs killed 129,000-246,000 people, mostly civilians. A year later, John Hersey's classic Hiroshima was published in the New Yorker; subsequently brought out in book form by Knopf, it has never been out of print and has sold more than three million copies.
Recently, Chronicle Books published Lists of Note: An Eclectic Collection Deserving of a Wider Audience, compiled by Shaun Usher. Usher's 125 lists, with facsimiles or illustrations, will intrigue and amuse, and sometimes surprise: Einstein, as his first marriage deteriorated, imposed conditions on his wife if they were to stay together, including "I will receive three meals regularly in my room....
As a kid, I never went to summer camp. The farthest I ever got from home was family camping trips to the Oregon coast, and if it wasn't the mosquitoes, it was the rain that bummed us out. But had I known then just how terrible a summer vacation could be, I probably wouldn't have whined so much.
My reliable fallback for summer reading--or any time I want already known pure pleasure--is anything byElinor Lipman or Mary Stewart. Add to that the witty Edmund Crispin, Patricia Wentworth and Georgette Heyer mysteries, and I have my desert island library. Oh, and Dorothy Sayers and P.D. James. And... and....Lately I've read a few books that not only are good vacation choices, but are novels I expect I'll be rereading.
Merryn is up late at night, awaiting and fearing her husband's drunken homecoming, when she opens the door to find two policemen announcing that he has been killed in a car accident. She quickly bundles up their nine-year-old daughter, the precocious Tenney, and leaves Dallas, Tex., for her mother's home in San Miguel de Allende, in central Mexico.
Following the successful release of her book "Situation Zane - Autism who knew?", Caribbean-American autism advocate Rosanne Small-Morgan known affectionately as 'Rosie' is making major impact with the masses, been in high demand for speaking engagements on the topic of autism and has even received prestigious accolades from political figures for her work with the cause.
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