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MERCED, Calif. -- Civic engagement in communities of color across California has long lagged behind levels traditionally found in white communities. Now, a new study looks at how and why those disparities could continue in future generations. According to the study, “Unequal Voices, Part II,” released by the statewide advocacy group Advancement Project, California’s Asian-American and Latino adult populations are vastly underrepresented in most political activities, while whites are overrepresented. From donations to petitions, voters of color are less likely than white counterparts to engage with politicians and campaigns.
SAN FRANCISCO, California - After nearly 22 years of living in the United States without papers, working some 12 hours a day and feeling like he was nothing more than a pair of hands, in 2014 Abad began to doubt his life. He’d just separated from his first wife, which made it harder to see his son. He was having trouble sleeping and eating, instead seeking refuge in alcohol. And the stress of being undocumented began to feel overwhelming. One night, he began to search Google for ways to commit suicide. 
With the 2020 Census three years out, civil rights groups and census experts are sounding the alarm that pending actions by the Trump administration and Congress could severely hamper an accurate count of all communities. “Congress’ failure over the past few years to pay for rigorous 2020 Census planning, and now the Trump Administration’s insufficient budget request for 2018, will strike at the heart of operations specifically designed to make the census better in historically undercounted communities,” said Terri Ann Lowenthal, former staff director with the House Subcommittee on Census and Population.
New America Media, Photo Essay, David Bacon, Posted: Apr 02, 2017. Above photo: In Playas de Tijuana, on the Mexican side of the border wall between Mexico and the U.S., Catelina Cespedes and Carlos Alcaide greet Florita Galvez, who is on the U.S. side. The family came from Santa Monica Cohetzala in Puebla to meet at the wall.
When it comes to Trump’s changes to immigration policy, many immigrants have a common question: Who is affected and what do the changes mean for them? It’s a question that Martha Ruch, staff attorney at Asian Americans Advancing Justice-Los Angeles says she hears constantly from her clients. Since taking office, Trump dramatically expanded the definition of who can be prioritized for deportation. Immigration attorneys say that under the expanded definition, nearly any undocumented immigrant could be considered a target.
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